• Dorothée Jourdain

Advice for Musicians during the Pandemic : Part 5, Interacting with Audiences

Updated: Jun 3, 2021


In our two last posts, we mentioned the promotional and marketing tools you can prepare to strategically present yourself to potential presenters. In this post, we will focus on digital mediums you can use to engage with your audiences. With concert events on hold, artists can’t interact with audiences in person and much of this interaction has moved online. This transition can be difficult for musicians that are used to interacting with a live audience. Here are some tips and ideas that hopefully will inspire you to create new and original content to keep connections going during this time.


Social Media

Use your social media platforms (Facebook, Instagram, etc.) to interact with your audience and fans on a regular basis. Share content that inspires you, projects you are working on, and personal anecdotes. Keep in mind that the purpose of your social media profiles is not only to promote your work and your concerts, but also to show your personality to your audience. In other words, when a fan follows you, they want to have direct access to you as a person and your artistic process, not just your final artistic output. (If you only have a personal Facebook profile, we advise creating a separate artist page.) There is a lot more to talk about regarding effective social media strategies, so stay tuned for a future “Agent Advice” post covering this important topic. For now, we recommend that you start with what we mentioned above: promote yourself, as an artist and an individual. If you still do not know where to start, we suggest to create a social media challenge where you create short informal videos on a regular basis (#100daysofpractice, #30daysongchallenge, #30daysofpedagogy, or your own challenge).


Recording while social distancing

For soloists, the recording possibilities are endless! If you want to harmonize with yourself, Acapella is an app that can make this easy for you.

For ensembles, we have probably all seen these compilations of videos of virtual ensemble performances at a distance.


In line with advice from global health authorities, we strongly advise artists not to meet in person with people you do not live with for ensemble performances during this time. Therefore, here are two different procedures you can use depending on the quality of the content you want to create: Low audio quality :

  1. Transcribe all parts in a software program to send a guide track (with clicks and all the parts) to all musicians

  2. Ask performers to count off verbally at the start of the video. It will be easier to line up the videos when editing.

  3. Ask all the musicians to record their part with the track on their phone.

  4. Use a cloud share like Google Drive, Box, or Dropbox to share the files.

  5. Edit all the clips in an NLE (non-linear video editor) like Premiere, FCPX, etc.

High audio quality:

  1. Transcribe all parts in a software program to send a guide track (with clicks and all the parts) to all musicians.

  2. Ask performers to count off verbally at the start of the video. It will be easier to line up the videos when editing

  3. Have the performers submit audio recordings only with this verbal count-off.

  4. Use a cloud share like Google Drive, Box, or Dropbox to share the files.

  5. Sync them in DAW (digital audio workstation)

  6. Then ask the performers to submit a “lip sync” video of them playing their parts, or use video footage of the audio recording with the audio removed.

  7. Sync all of those up with your audio mix in an NLE (non-linear video editor) like Premiere, FCPX, etc.

Patreon

Patreon is an online platform that allows you to start a membership-based community to develop a direct relationship with your biggest fans and generate predictable, recurring revenue from your creative work. This allows you to create content for a dedicated audience that wants to support you directly connect more directly with you and your art.

Share what your audience can do to support you

Invite your audience to support you. While being kind and sensitive, you can still promote your art and try to make some money with your merchandise and recordings. You can also encourage your fans to share your music and tag you and listen to your music on streaming platforms, since every play is monetized. Keep in mind that in this situation, most people are not looking for high production value. Showing vulnerability, the clutter of your home, and/or your emotional state will add to the authenticity and the connection people are looking for. Hopefully this will give you some ideas and inspire you to create more content to interact with your audience. In our next post, we will discuss ideas on how to offer a livestream performance.

Sources and additional information

“This is like a musical hug”: How the Toronto Symphony Orchestra created one stunning performance from 29 separate locations by JEFFREY BEECHER (Toronto Life) 11 Tools for Collaborating on Music Remotely Our 7 Favorite Collaborative Music-Making Apps Resources for musicians during the COVID-19 pandemic - DIY Musician Special thanks to Jeremy VanSlyke from LEAF Music


82 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All